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United States Constitution

Information and resources about the US Constitution.

14th Amendment Summary
The 14th Amendment was one of the three Civil War amendments. It has had a huge impact on America. Learn about this key amendment with this summary.

Twentieth Amendment
The twentieth amendment is also known as the Lame Duck amendment.

Nineteenth Amendment
The nineteenth amendment gave women the right to vote.

Eighteenth Amendment
The eighteenth amendment began the Prohibition era.

Sixteenth Amendment
The sixteenth amendment allowed Congress to levy an income tax.

Twelfth Amendment
The twelfth amendment changed the law so that presidential and vice-presidential candidates would be separately designated on ballots.

Eleventh Amendment
The eleventh amendment ensures that states have sovereign immunity in court cases brought by citizens.

Eighth Amendment
The eighth amendment protects against excessive bail and cruel and unusual punishment.

Seventh Amendment
The seventh amendment ensures the right to a jury trial.

Sixth Amendment
The sixth amendment among other things ensures the right to a speedy and public trial.

Fifth Amendment
The fifth amendment protects against double jeopardy and ensures due process and the right not to be forced to speak against yourself in a trial.

Fourth Amendment
The fourth amendment protects US citizens against unreasonable search and seizure.

First Amendment
The first amendment ensures freedoms of speech, religion, the press, assembly, and petition.

Tenth Amendment
The tenth amendment reinforces the idea of federalism and the rights preserved by the states.

Ninth Amendment
The ninth amendment was included to ensure that just because a right was not enumerated in the Constitution does not mean it is not preserved for the people.

Thirteenth Amendment
The thirteenth amendment outlaws slavery.

Seventeenth Amendment
The seventeenth amendment put in place the direct election of senators.

Twenty-First Amendment
The twenty-first amendment repealed the 18th amendment thereby ending prohibition.

Twenty-Second Amendment
The twenty-second amendment limits the president to two terms or 10 years in office.

Twenty-Third Amendment
The twenty-third amendment gave Washington, D.C. three presidential electors.

Twenty-Fourth Amendment
The twenty-fourth amendment made poll taxes illegal for federal elections.

Twenty-Fifth Amendment
The twenty-fifth amendment clarifies the rule of presidential succession.

Twenty-Sixth Amendment
The twenty-sixth amendment gave people 18 years of age the right to vote.

Twenty-Seventh Amendment
The twenty-seventh amendment does not allow a sitting Congress to vote in its own pay raises.

Third Amendment
The third amendment forbade the government from quarter troops in private homes.

Second Amendment
The second amendment granted individuals the right to bear arms.

Fifteenth Amendment
The fifteenth amendment provided for universal suffrage for individuals of all races.

Fourteenth Amendment
The fourteenth amendment was a key amendment in the history of civil rights.

US Constitution Fast Facts - The Constitution of the United States
Want a quick overview of the facts surrounding the US Constitution? Check out these fast facts.

Top Six Items You Might Not Know Were in the Constitution
While many of us have studied the Constitution in high school, how many of us remember each of the sections? Here are six interesting items that are included in the consitution that you might not know about. Enjoy!

Separation of Powers
What is the separation of powers according to the US Constitution? What is the origin of this idea? Learn about the term separation of powers with this glossary entry.

Checks and Balances
The government of the United States was set up with three branches, each of which has specific powers and specific checks that they can use to ensure that no one branch gains too much power. Here is a look at the checks and balances of the three branches of government.

Social Contract
The term social contract refers to the belief that government should be a contract between the people and the governing body. Learn more about this idea of the social contract and how it affected the founding of the United States with this glossary entry.

FAQ: Who is the father of the Constitution?
Who is the known as the Father of the US Constitution? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: What was the order for ratification of the Constitution?
What was the order for ratification of the Constitution? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: What methods are allowed for amending the Constitution?
What methods are allowed for amending the Constitution? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: How many amendments have been added to the Constitution?
How many amendments have been added to the Constitution? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: What are the Bill of Rights?
What are the Bill of Rights? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: What rights and liberties are guaranteed within the Constitution?
What rights and liberties are guaranteed within the body of the Constitution itself? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: What is the Great Compromise?
Learn all about the Great Compromise that helped ensure the passage of the US Constitution.

FAQ: What is the necessary and proper clause?
What is the necessary and proper clause? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: What does the Constitution say about slavery?
What does the Constitution say about slavery? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: What were the Federalist Papers?
What were the Federalist Papers? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

FAQ: Who were the chief anti-federalists?
Who were the chief anti-federalists? Find out in this Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) about the Constitution.

Constitutional Convention
Here is a profile of the Constitutional Convention.

Key Compromises of the Constitutional Convention
The US Constitution has been called a "bundle of compromises" due to the fact that the delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787 had to compromise on numerous key points in order to create a new Constitution that was acceptable to each of the states. Following is a list of the key compromises that helped make the US Constitution become...

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